Instant Opinion

‘Boris Johnson will be quite happy to ride out the storm over Dominic Raab’

Your digest of analysis and commentary from the British and international press

Dominic Raab

1

Chris Stevenson for The Independent

Will Dominic Raab be shamed into resigning? Given this government, I very much doubt it

on ministerial shamelessness

“It would be fair to say it has not been an ideal few days for the foreign secretary, Dominic Raab,” writes Chris Stevenson for The Independent. He reminds us that the minister was criticised for being on holiday in Crete when Kabul was falling to the Taliban and then lambasted for his demeanour during the Afghanistan debate in the Commons. “Will Raab be shamed into giving up his post?” Stevenson asks. “I very much doubt it,” he answers. “With the amount of recriminations flying around about how Afghanistan now faces this situation given the 20 years of UK involvement, I’d speculate that Johnson will be quite happy to just ride out the storm.”

2

George Monbiot for The Guardian

Why is life on Earth still taking second place to fossil fuel companies?

on futile gestures

“Almost everyone is now at least vaguely aware that we face the greatest catastrophe our species has ever confronted,” writes George Monbiot for The Guardian, “yet scarcely anyone alters their behaviour in response: above all, their driving, flying and consumption of meat and dairy.” Our rulers are no better, he feels, writing that “as our house burns, the government sends in the tanker trucks to spray petrol on the flames”. The long-standing environmental activist adds that “unless we leave fossil fuels in the ground, any commitment to stop climate breakdown is merely gestural” and warns that “the atmosphere does not respond to gestures”.

3

Greg Bensinger for The New York Times

The illusion of privacy is getting harder to sell

on tech companies’ limits

Apple may say “relentlessly, that privacy is the central feature of its iPhone”, but “that’s only true until Apple changes its mind about its policies”, wrote Greg Bensinger at The New York Times. You’d be “forgiven for being a little creeped out” by the tech company’s latest proposition of scanning people’s phones for “known illegal pornographic images”. It’s not only this “that should give users pause”, notes Bensinger. “If Apple believes that tracking is anathema to privacy” then why not “disable tracking as a default?” he asks. “Tech companies would like us to believe that they hold the keys to their own privacy”, but ultimately “our data is as secure as their policies”.

4

Taha Lokhandwala for The Telegraph

The triple lock fudge is not about young vs old - it ruins everyone’s pension

on a policy U-turn

While “it should come as no surprise that the government” will go back on its 2019 manifesto pledge to maintain the state pension triple lock, the simple fact is the UK’s state retirement benefit “is not good enough”, writes The Telegraph’s deputy personal finance editor, Taha Lokhandwala. One pension firm indicates that an 8.8% rise still leaves the payment below the figure “deemed necessary for the minimum acceptable standard of living”. And not only that, breaking the triple lock “hurts those more likely to vote Conservative”. The debate “is not about young versus old”, Lokhandwala adds. This not only affects pensions “but everyone who will retire in the future”.

5

Bastian Giegerich for the Financial Times

Germany must end the confusion over security and defence

on the need for a new mindset

A seven-month mission in the Indo-Pacific region being undertaken by a German frigate has been “heralded as a symbol of a new geopolitical seriousness in Berlin” – but it is more representative of “the confusion at the heart of German security and defence policy”, writes Bastian Giegerich in the Financial Times. Much of the country’s security debate is “informed by ideas that are of dubious value”, and “the next German government should abandon the shibboleths of the Merkel era”, he continues. As the power of “resurgent, revisionist and repressive powers” rises, Germany’s “postwar security and prosperity” are at risk. A strategic mindset is needed, Giegerich concludes, otherwise “the coming decades will provide a hard education for Berlin”.

Recommended

Insulate Britain: who are they and what do they want?
Insulate Britain protesters
Profile

Insulate Britain: who are they and what do they want?

‘Why is there a shortage of CO2? Well, it’s got naff all to do with Brexit’
Piglets
Instant Opinion

‘Why is there a shortage of CO2? Well, it’s got naff all to do with Brexit’

‘Ignore Twitter and it becomes Angela Rayner in a broom cupboard’
Nadine Dorries
Instant Opinion

‘Ignore Twitter and it becomes Angela Rayner in a broom cupboard’

COP26: will China play ball on climate change?
Emissions in China
Today’s big question

COP26: will China play ball on climate change?

Popular articles

Doctor says we should not sleep naked because of flatulent spraying
The feet of a person sleeping in a bed
Tall Tales

Doctor says we should not sleep naked because of flatulent spraying

Abba returns: how the Swedish supergroup and their ‘Abba-tars’ are taking a chance on a reunion
Abba on stage
In Brief

Abba returns: how the Swedish supergroup and their ‘Abba-tars’ are taking a chance on a reunion

The man tasked with putting a price on 9/11’s lost lives
Kenneth Feinberg at a Congressional hearing
Profile

The man tasked with putting a price on 9/11’s lost lives

The Week Footer Banner