In Brief

Premier League clubs call for Brexit immigration exemption

Football bosses call on government to safeguard future of players after country leaves EU

Premier League chairmen have called on the government to exempt footballers from post-Brexit immigration rules, amid fears about impact leaving the European Union will have on the world's richest football league.

Stoke City chairman Peter Coates and David Gold, the co-owner of West Ham, led the calls after a meeting of club owners and executives in London.

Gold said: "The bottom line is the Premier League is the greatest league the world has ever known - why would you stifle that? Why would you want that to change?"

More than two-thirds of Premier League players are foreign, with the majority from EU countries, reports The Times.

"Clubs fear that Brexit could have a huge impact on their ability to make signings from the Continent... If footballers are not given an exemption, those from the EU would have to satisfy work-permit rules that demand they have made a substantial number of appearances for their national team in competitive matches."

Under the new rules, the likes of Juan Mata and Ander Herrera of Manchester United and Chelsea defender Cesar Azpilicueta would not be able to play in England.

Chancellor Philip Hammond has promised that "highly-skilled and highly-trained paid workers" will be exempt from new immigration rules, says The Independent. The clubs hope footballers will be considered part of that group.

However, not everyone is concerned. The Times reports that some believe "a reduction in the number of European players in the Premier League would give more chances to English players and boost the quality of the national team".US business website Bloomberg adds that Brexit "will affect the lives of millions of Europeans living in the UK", with the "banking, health-care and hospitality sectors also facing a nervous wait for clarity".

Premier League officials have held preliminary discussions with the government on the possible effects of Brexit, continues the site.

"Clubs are already feeling the affects of Britain's decision to end its decades-long alliance with its European neighbours. The pound has plunged against the euro and the U.S. dollar, making foreign recruits more expensive. Some of those costs are mitigated by the fact foreign TV income is received in dollars."

Recommended

How the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee is being celebrated
The Queen smiling
The latest on . . .

How the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee is being celebrated

‘British troops sent to Ukraine’
Today's newspaper front pages
Today’s newspapers

‘British troops sent to Ukraine’

Red Meat and Save Big Dog: what is Boris Johnson’s next move?
Boris Johnson
Today’s big question

Red Meat and Save Big Dog: what is Boris Johnson’s next move?

BBC licence fee: the pros and cons
BBC
In Depth

BBC licence fee: the pros and cons

Popular articles

Ten Things You Need to Know Today: 16 January 2022
10 Downing Street
Daily Briefing

Ten Things You Need to Know Today: 16 January 2022

Djokovic vs. Nadal vs. Federer: career records and grand slams
Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer have all won 20 grand slam singles titles
Profile

Djokovic vs. Nadal vs. Federer: career records and grand slams

Why is the UK in pole position to emerge from Covid-19 first?
A woman wearing a face mask waits for the tube in London
Today’s big question

Why is the UK in pole position to emerge from Covid-19 first?

The Week Footer Banner