In Brief

'Anonymous' hackers post details of EDL backers online

Activists send YouTube warning to far-right group and post contact details for more than 200 names

A LIST apparently containing the names, phone numbers and addresses of leaders and backers of the English Defence League has been published online by a group claiming to represent the Anonymous UK 'hacktivist' movement. Links to the file of more than 200 names appeared on social networking sites including Twitter after a message addressed to the far-right organisation was posted on YouTube. The list includes contact details for regional "leaders" of the organisation and for people who are said to have donated funds. Some of the donors' names are from outside the UK. It is not clear how the hackers got hold of the information or if it is accurate. The Independent reports that more lists are expected to be published over the next few days. In the YouTube message, the activists accuse EDL members of acting "like a pack of raving ignoramuses, furthering only bigotry and segregation". The statement describes the murder of Drummer Lee Rigby in Woolwich last week as "horrific and heinous" but adds: "You, however, have used this as another excuse to further spread your campaign of hate, bigotry, and misinformation." The message promises the "systematic and comprehensive desiccation of your cult". The EDL took down some internet pages after the publication of the list and reportedly closed its discussion forum, but continued to send defiant tweets in response to activists. It claims that the list dates back to 2010. The BBC sounded a note of caution. "It is unclear whether the people listed are actually members of the EDL. A similar list which published the names of supposed British National Party members included some people who turned out not to be members."

Four people have been charged after as many as 1,000 EDL supporters staged a series of protests in London on Monday in the wake of Drummer Rigby's killing by Islamic extremists. There were 13 arrests as police tried to keep the EDL and anti-fascist groups apart.

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