In Brief

Hurricane Gonzalo: storm causes travel disruption

Met Office issues warning as flights are cancelled and roads are closed due to gale force winds

Heavy rain and gale force winds have caused travel disruption across the country as the tail end of Hurricane Gonzalo reached the UK.

Heathrow airport has cancelled 10 per cent of all flights by major carriers on Tuesday morning, but reports suggest that the disruption to flights may not be as severe as first predicted.

The BBC's Carol Kirkwood said gusts of up to 70mph have been recorded and have the potential to cause "slight structural damage" to properties and could also uproot small trees.

Motorists have been told to exercise caution as forecasters at the Met Office issued a yellow warning and localised flooding was predicted in some parts of the UK.

Two lorries have overturned in Cambridgshire, several roads in Wales have been closed and some ferry services are not operating due to safety concerns. Several rail services are currently experiencing minor delays, including South West and Gatwick Express trains.

British Airways said: "The forecast of poor weather has meant that, along with other airlines at Heathrow, we have made some proactive flight cancellations to give customers as much time as possible to be rebooked onto alternative flights."

Officials at Heathrow airport are advising customers to check online if their flights have been affected before they travel.

The hurricane caused widespread damage and power blackouts when it made landfall in Bermuda last week, with wind speeds reaching 110mph.

Hurricane Gonzalo: Britain braced for storms

20 October

The storm formerly known as Hurricane Gonzalo is expected to arrive in Britain tonight, bringing heavy rain, gale force winds and the threat of flash flooding.

It caused severe damage when it tore through the Caribbean island of Bermuda on Friday, leaving more than 31,000 people without power. Winds reached speeds of 110mph, but only minor injuries were reported.

Bermuda is one of the world's wealthiest countries, and the government imposes strict building standards.

As it crossed the cooler waters of the North Artlantic, Hurricane Gonzalo has lost much of its intensity, but it may still cause disruption in the UK.

"Gales will move eastwards from Monday night, mainly affecting Northern Ireland, northern England, northern Wales, and parts of Scotland," the BBC reports.

The strongest winds are expected on Tuesday, when the morning rush hour could be affected. Fallen leaves trapped in drains and gulleys may mean that standing water is slow to clear.

Forecasters are working closely with the Highways Agency, which says it may "need to look at closing major crossings to high-sided vehicles," according to the Daily Telegraph. 

"Some uncertainty remains in the track and intensity," the Met Office said, "but there remains the potential for localised disruption to travel, especially as the strongest winds will coincide with rush hour in places.

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